Typewriter Monogram
Gifts

Monogram Rules

Monogramming adds a thoughtful detail to any item and is the perfect way to make a gift feel even more special & unique. One of the most important decisions in purchasing a monogrammed gift is selecting the monogram style and order of the initials. But, what is proper monogram etiquette exactly? Which initial goes first? How do different size letters effect the order of the initials? What is appropriate for same-sex couples, opposite-sex couples or singles? We hope we can calm your nerves and guide you in the proper direction to suit your individual needs. 

A LITTLE HISTORY

As the oldest form of identification in the world, monograms date back to as early as 350BC. They served many roles, from indicating social status, to serving as a signature for royals and artists, to being a form of currency in the barter system. The earliest known examples were used on coins. The Greek cities who issued the coins, often used the first two letters of the city’s name. Monograms were also used to identify property and were typically ornate, which makes them desirable when adding monograms to elegant gifts even today.

SINGLE-LETTER TRADITIONAL MONOGRAMS

Single-letter monograms, traditionally, represent the last name for both men and unmarried women. Rules for creating monograms for children are the same as those for unmarried adults. For a child it is important to consider where and how they will be using a personalized gift. For safety reasons you may not want to put too much information on something a child will have in public. Choose instead to use a monogram versus a name on something like a backpack.

A single initial that can be either the first or last name initial. Example: Anne Masters or Magie Davies. Modern or traditional, you can’t go wrong. Consider who the gift is for and what fits them best.


If you’re looking for a cool and custom gift to impress the ‘I do crew‘ in your wedding party go with a single initial monogram. It’s a modern twist – First name with first name initial above or just an initial only. Example: Andrew Michael or Michael Davis. Modern or traditional you can’t go wrong. As mentioned above, consider who the gift is for and what fits them best.

THE INFAMOUS THREE-LETTER MONOGRAMS

Traditional, three-letter Victorian monograms are the variety we use most often today. Letter arrangement depends on marital status and letter sizes within the monogram. Monograms add a special touch engagement, weddings and anniversary gifts. Something they will treasure for a lifetime and become family heirlooms.

Single Men and Single Women

Weekend Canvas Bag Shown with three initial monogram
Example: Tina Nicole Smith – TNS or Terrance Nicolas Smith – TNS.

Single men and single women use the first initial of their first, middle and last name, in that order.

Large surname letter in the middle

Three Letter Monogram with Large surname letter in the middle on a dopp kit
Example: Jenny Lynn Mendoza or James Leonardo Mendoza.

Single men and women would use the first initial of their first, last and middle names, in that order. The last name is always the centered, largest font.

MARRIED THREE INITIAL MONOGRAM

Same-Sex Couples

Traditional Monogram Printed Napkins in Black Foil showing a traditional 3 letter monogram  for married same-sex couples
Example: Rebecca & Brianna Winslow-Ford.
Traditional Monogram Printed Napkins | Item No. 685

For married same-sex couples who choose to use one last name, even hyphenated, the first initial of the first name on the left is up to the couple as to who would be first. Possibly setting a family tradition going forward with who is always on the left or right. The center initial will be the chosen last name initial. The same initials would be used on linens, glass and tableware.

Opposite-Sex Couples

Traditional Monogram Printed Napkins in Black Foil showing a traditional 3 letter monogram  for married opposite-sex couples
Example: Anne & David Begor
Traditional Monogram Printed Napkins | Item No. 685

For married opposite-sex couples the bride’s first initial is on the left of the last name initial and the groom’s first initial is on the right, as in ladies first. (Often used on linens). Shown here on our Traditional Monogram Printed Napkins.

Personalized 7 oz. Silver Rim Champagne Flutes (Set of 2) showing a three letter monogram
Example: Benjamin & Sandy Hortense
Personalized 7 oz. Silver Rim Champagne Flutes (Set of 2) | Item No. 1333

A more traditional view is the groom’s first initial is first and the bride’s first initial is last. (Traditionally used on glass and tableware).

TWO INITIAL MONOGRAM

Different Last Names

Modern Stacked Two Letter Monogram on a rose Gold Steel Wine Glass
Example: Marc Jacobs & Jeremy Prince,
Modern Stacked Two Letter Monogram

For unmarried couples, and married couples who choose to keep their individual last names, both initials of each partners’ last names are used together as a 2-letter monogram. For a more modern twist on the two letter monogram stack initials or enter a horizontal line between them. Example: J|P

Use First Names

For all couples, married or unmarried, you may want to keep it simple and use the initials of each partners’ first names together as a 2-letter monogram. Example: Jenny & Perry Roberts

MARRIED PERSONS INDIVIDUAL MONOGRAMS

Women

Three letter Monogram on a Universal wood monogrammed key chain.
Example: Anne (first name) Cindy (middle name) Benson (last name),
would be ABC, not ACB. 

It is tradition for the woman to use her maiden name initial as the middle initial in three-letter monograms. Otherwise, she would use her first name initial, married name initial, and middle name initial. Shown above the monogram is in the traditional last name initial in the middle position format.

Men

Personalized polished stainless steel key chain shows the traditional last name initial in the middle position format.
Example: Robert (first name) Edward (middle name) Hanson (last name),
would be RHE, not REH.

It is tradition for the man to use his last name initial as the middle initial in three-letter monograms. Otherwise for new-tradition men, he would use his first name initial, married name initial, and middle name initial. Shown above the monogram is in the traditional last name initial in the middle position format.

While a highly decorative script font may look just fine on it’s own, it could be extremely difficult to read when used in traditional three-letter monograms. Also note that although these are the more “traditional monogram rules,” there are no right and wrong ways to create monograms. Most of the time, it depends on the person receiving the gift. Focus on fitting the design to their personality, and you won’t go wrong!

We’d love to hear your thoughts on Monograms. Tell us how you’ve decided what monogram style works for you in the comments below.

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